Teaching English in Hungary

Do you love to travel? Do you like working with children? If you answered yes, then consider teaching abroad. I taught English in Hungary for one year through a program called CETP (Central European Teaching program), and got placed in Hajdúszoboszló, Hungary in the Eastern part of the country, near Romania. To get accepted into […]

Do you love to travel? Do you like working with children? If you answered yes, then consider teaching abroad. I taught English in Hungary for one year through a program called CETP (Central European Teaching program), and got placed in Hajdúszoboszló, Hungary in the Eastern part of the country, near Romania.

To get accepted into the program, one has to be

1) a native English speaker and
2) have a University degree.
That’s it!

The program directors then work with the Hungarian government to sort out immigration papers, and local representatives from each school work with the English teacher individually to set up a bank account and establish housing.

Being an English teacher in a foreign country was not easy, as there were many cultural and linguistic barriers. It was, however, very fulfilling work and I adored all of my students (all 200+ of them ages 7-14). At first I was overwhelmed with 23 different lessons each week and teaching kids from 1st through 8th grade, but eventually I got used to it.

Teaching definitely has its perks, and I was able to travel during fall, winter and spring break. Since I didn’t pay for my housing, I was able to use all of my earnings for travel and fun.

The lifestyle in Hajdúszoboszló was pretty slow. It is a spa town, and home to one of Europe’s largest water parks. Having the spa there brought a lot of older people who had long since retired, and were looking for a place to settle down. Almost everyone rode their bikes around town, and it was very small and quaint. The weather was mostly sunny, warm in spring, hot in summer and cold with a little bit of snow in the winter. The language barrier made it difficult to connect with the locals, but I managed to have a great time anyways. Also, the cost of living in Hungary is very cheap, so that was definitely a perk!

I flew from Denver to London to Budapest. While in Hungary, I either rode my bike around town, or took trains to Budapest (about 3 hours away), a bus to Debrecen (Hungary’s second largest city with several Universities), and took many trains and cheap flights to other countries. The budget airline, based out of Hungary with flights in many other countries and cities was Wizz air. Being a budget airline, you will pay extra for checked bags, food, booze and other treats on the flight. If you don’t check a bag, and bring snacks with you, it is a really inexpensive way to travel long distances.

I stayed in an apartment building about 3 minutes from my school. It had a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living room and little deck (great for watching sunsets!). My rent was covered by the school, and it was a really nice little place. I met my landlords a few times, and they were very helpful and kind.

I worked for a local public Primary school and taught 1st through 8th grade English Conversation.I enjoyed my school and my students very much. Some of the other teachers spoke and taught English and they were friendly and helpful.

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